Thursday, February 4, 2016

Psi-Wars -- Adjusting the Templates

Now that we've adjusted the rules accepted that GURPS Action can serve as the engine for our Psi-Wars campaign, we can also revisit the templates from GURPS Space, which are pretty basic and constrained, and we can replace them with something more befitting of our particular vision of  cinematic space-opera universe.

Before we begin, though, I want to make a very important note: We don't actually need to do this. If Action 2 is mostly compatible with how we see Psi-Wars, then Action 1 is as well.  There's no reason that we can't just use Shooters and Wheelmen and Faces, with a modicum of adjustment.  In fact, any templates I create here will probably look mostly like those already.  So, if you're interested in running this now, just do it!

But say we want something a little more specific. Perhaps we want to make the Core/Rim split more pronounced by writing it right into the templates, or we feel like some of the templates don't really fit the Action templates: A bounty hunter isn't really an Investigator, nor is he an Assassin, nor is he a Big Man, but he's a little of all three. Certainly Space Knights are almost nothing like anything in Action, except possibly the Weapon Master.  Likewise, some of the Action templates really don't fit well at all in a Star-Wars inspired universe, like the Wire Rat or the Hacker.

I'm going to go ahead and make new templates, in part because of the problems noted above, but also so that you, dear reader, if  you are unfamiliar with how templates are made, can have a chance to see how I go about making them.

I prefer to open up my copy of GURPS Template Toolkits 1: Characters and use the process noted in there.  First, we would need to define our core activity (which, if you remember, we did in Iteration 1).  Then we'd need to work out niches, with suitable traits, that address those core activities ("Spying, Combat, Space"), then mix and match those niches and traits to create interesting templates ("An assassin is about the stealth and deception portions of spying mixed with a stealthy, ambush-focused combat").  We do this to make sure we don't miss anything.  The book goes into exquisite detail about how to do all of that, but the building of this pre-framework framework takes a lot of work.  Do we want to make that much of an investment? Do we need to?

Well, we've already noted that we can use GURPS Action, right? Action already has a list of "appropriate traits" and it's already divided all of its niches up and put them in a handy "build your own character" book called GURPS Action 4: Specialists. This excellent book will let you make nearly any character you want... including, say, a Bounty Hunter or a Fighter Jock or a Diplomat (for aggressive negotiations).

Of course, we want to build a template rather than a character, but Specialists can give us guide-posts on what skills might be useful.  As an example, I'm going to create the Bounty Hunter template right here in this blog post.

What is a Bounty Hunter?

The first step in creating a template is defining the template.  What is a bounty hunter? Well, it says right in GURPS Space (Page 227):
Bounty hunters catch fugitives and bring them back in for a hefty reward.
Thus, in dangerous, anarchic rim, beyond the reach of the law, a bounty hunter hunts criminals others aren't willing to pursue, nabs them, and brings them back to the authorities.  This implies quite a few traits.  First, they have some level of respect for the law but, at the same time, do not belong to "the system." They are neither police nor noble, and is often little better than a criminal or thug himself. They go where those "in the system" dare not tread.  A bounty hunter walks in a violent world and engages in violence, but restrains himself at the last moment, bringing in his prey alive ("No disintegrations").  A bounty hunter needs to be able to receive an assignment, figure out where his prey went, travel those long, interstellar distances while tracking him, get close to the target, subdue the target, and then bring them back for their reward.

Let's look at the GURPS Space again and see what it considered important for the bounty hunter, mechanically.

For advantages, it requires Legal Enforcement Powers, which in this case represents very limited powers, and the “local jurisdiction” of “fugitives only.” Legal Enforcement Powers are on the Action “Suitable Advantages List” so that's acceptable.

For skills, it emphasizes Criminology, I presume for understanding how the criminal mind works. This is certainly an acceptable skill (and puts lie to my idea of de-emphasizing it), Law (“Region”, though I'll replace that with “Galactic”), presumably so the Bounty Hunter knows what he can and cannot do. This is also an acceptable skill. Finally, we have Streetwise, which represents understanding the street well enough to ask questions and find your query.

In general, the template has a strong focus on combat competence (Gunslinger, Fearlessness, High Pain Threshold, Beam Weapons, Brawling, etc), a decent focus on intelligence gathering (Improved Perception, Intuition, Photographic memory, Research, Shadowing), and a minor emphasis on “fitting in socially” (Cultural Adaptability, Social Chameleon, Acting, Fast-Talk), and resoluteness (Fearlessness, Single Minded, Unfazeable, Indomitable).

Choosing Bounty Hunter Skill Sets

Specialists work by taking a standard "Basic Action Template" and upgrading it with skill sets appropriate to the character.  We're going to do the same, but we're mostly noting how useful these skills are to the overall template.  Just as a character might have a particular talent or skill come up in three different skill sets, thus becoming highly adept at a particular thing, we're going to note the total "cost" of all of our traits, to get an idea of how much emphasis our choices place on certain traits or skills.

However, I should emphasize that for our purposes, this is a guideline.  We just want to see which traits might be useful to a bounty hunter.  Obviously a given character won't take them all.  We just need to present the options to them.  As we look at each template, we'll decide which traits we see as "primary,"  vital to the concept, and which we see as optional, which represent minor background choices or particular paths a specific character might choose.

So, what skill sets suit a bounty hunter?

Hostile Extraction leaps out at me right away, as this is what a bounty hunter does. They go in and bring a character out.  
  • This skill set offers Craftiness, but that looks iffy to me.  Some bounty hunters will be subtle, but many will just blow open your door, shoot you full of sleep darts, and then cart you off to the Capital world for trial.  So we mark it as optional.
  • Brawling is too specific. We'll just note "Unarmed Striking" and note it as primary. 
  • Fast-Draw is also very useful: More than just getting the drop on someone, it'll let you shift back and forth from armed to unarmed, which is useful for a character who needs to grapple.  This is primary as well. 
  • The skill set also offers Guns, but we'll trade that in for Beam Weapons and put it on primary (especially given that blasters can  have a stun setting). 
  • Holdout is less immediately important: Some bounty hunters will sneak close to their target, but others will be more straight forward, thus it's optional.  
  • Intimidation will not just let you push people around to get to your target, but help you survive in the mean streets and keep your captive in line once you have him. Primary.
  • Psi-Wars doesn't use rope, generally, so Knot-Tying is dubious. Optional at best.
  • Liquid Projectors are much cooler in a UT setting than in a modern, Action setting, but Psi-Wars doesn't use vortex projectors.  The role of "mace" is replaced by Neurogloves and Nuerolash batons, so we'll add Shortsword to optional.
  • Shadowing is very central to what a bounty hunter does. Primary.
  • Stealth is also self-evidently primary.
  • Judo or Wrestling is key too, though we'll note them as "Unarmed Grappling"
You get the idea.  We need to go through each skill set, looking over the traits to see which are appropriate and which are not, a bit like building a GURPS character.  I won't go over the specifics of each skill set, except to explain why I chose each.

A bounty hunter is pretty tough and determined.  The Resistance skill-set looked tempting, but it's probably a bit much. Goon offers similar toughness of mind, and adds toughness of body too, so I took that instead. We need to find our prey, so that implies, in the very least, Detective. Once we've found them, we need to keep track of them with Surveillance or Electronic Surveillance (for homing beacons).  Once we've tracked our prey, we need to actually get to them.  That's going to be a mixture of Tactical Driving for car-chases (or quick escapes), Bushwhacker for bounty hunters who are adept at hunting in non-urban environments, and Urban Assault for those who hunt in urban environments. Once you've got to your target, you need to take him down.  Close Quarters Battle lets you deal with him personally, while Booby Traps lets you deal with him more elegantly.

Specialists also has Power-Ups, for turning our bounty hunter into more than just a pile of skills. Gunslinger seems appropriate, given the cinematic excellence of bounty hunters both in GURPS Space and on the silver screen.  Survivor again represents their tenacity, and Just that Good is an excellent choice for anyone who is top-notch in general.

Going over the resulting skill list, I notice a few open spots. GURPS Space has an emphasis on social acumen.  Why? Well, it might be that the bounty hunter regularly interacts with other cultures, but I think it's more likely that he needs to get close to the target. Violence is one option, but subtlety works as well (You can think of bounty-hunting as government-endorsed kidnapping).  So we can add Femme Fatale for one method of getting close, and Impersonation for another.  I considered Social Engineering, but a bounty hunter rarely manipulates his targets beyond closing in.  Finally, foot chases are almost a certainty, requiring some Parkour.

The Trait List

Primary Attributes: ST +1 [10]
Optional Attributes: HT +1 [10]
Primary Secondary Traits: Will +1 [5], Per +3 [15]
Optional Seconadary Traits: HP [2/level], Basic Speed [5/level], Basic Move +2 [5/level]
Primary Advantages: Combat Reflexes [15], Danger Sense [15], Daredevil [15], Fearlessness [2/level] or Unfazeable [15], Intuition [15], Law Enforcement [5]
Optional Advantages: Absolute Timing [2], Acute Senses [2/level], Ambidexterity, Appearance [Varies], Cat Fall [10], Craftiness 3 [15], Enhanced Dodge [15/level], Enhanced Dodge 2 (Dive for Cover) 2 [10], Enhanced Parry [5], Fit or Very Fit [5 or 15], Gunslinger [25], Hard to Kill [2/level], Hard to Subdue [2/level], High Pain Threshold [10], Night Vision 1-9 [1/level], Peripheral Vision [15], Rapid Healing or Very Rapid Healing [5 or 15], Rapier Wit [5], Recovery [10], Resistant to Poison +3 or +8 [3 or 5], Signature Gear [Varies], Wild Talent 1 [20], Upgrade Luck to Extraordinary Luck [30] for 15 points.
Primary Perks: Cheaper Gear (Vehicles), Equipment Bond (Vehicle), High Heeled Heroine, Honest Face, Penetrating Voice, Weapon Bond
Optional Perks: Robust Hearing, Robust Vision, Compact Frame, Off-Hand Weapon Training
Primary Skills:
Intimidation (Will/A) [12], Beam Weapons (Pistol) (DX/E) [3], Beam Weapons (Rifle) (DX/E) [4], Beam Weapons (Projector) (DX/E) [4], Criminology (IQ/A) [4], Fast-Draw (DX/E) (Ammo, Knife, Long-Arm, Pistol) [5], Forced Entry (DX/E) [2], Grappling [10], Intelligence Analysis (IQ/H) [4], Mechanic (Contragravity or Starship) (IQ/A) [4], Navigation (Hyperspace) (IQ/A) [4], Observation (Per/A) [8], Pilot (Contragravity or Starship) (DX/A) [10], Shadowing (IQ/A) [14], Stealth (DX/A) [4], Streetwise (IQ/A) [5], Tactics (IQ/H) [8], Throwing (DX/A) [3], Traps (IQ/A) [8], Unarmed Skill [10]
Optional Skills: Acting (IQ/A) [8], Acrobatics (DX/H) [4], Body Language (Per/A) [2], Camouflage (IQ/E) [4], Carousing (HT/E) [2], Climbing (DX/A) [4], Detect Lies (Per/H) [2], Disguise (IQ/A) [4], Electronics Operation (Sensors or Surveillance) (IQ/A) [8], Electronics Repair (Sensors or Surveillance) (IQ/A) [2], Escape (DX/H) [2], Explosives (Demolition) (IQ/A) [4], Fast-Talk (IQ/A) [8], Freight Handling (IQ/A) [2], Holdout (IQ/A) [2], Interrogation (IQ/A) [2], Jumping (DX/E) [1], Knife (DX/E) [1], Knot-Tying (DX/E) [2], Lip Reading (Per/A) [2], Naturalist (IQ/H) [4], Photography (IQ/A) [4], Research (IQ/A) [2], Running (HT/A) [4], Savoir-Faire (High Society, Mafia, Military, Dojo) (IQ/E) [1], Scrounging (Per/E) [1], Search (Per/A) [2], Sex Appeal (HT/A) [2], Shortsword (DX/A) [1], Smuggling (IQ/A) [6], Tracking (Per/A) [4], Traps (IQ/A) [4], Urban Survival (Per/A) [4]

Building the Template

We have far more than we need, but that's rather the point.  There are a variety of "right ways" to build a bounty hunter, from a former cop who went rogue and now hunts for profit, or a big bruiser who utterly destroys his opponent, to a clever girl who seems harmless until she springs her trap, to a old and dusty cowboy who hunts you down in the barren wastelands of a distant desert.  What we need to do, though, is narrow the list above into a usable template that allow players to express the uniqueness of their character while also hitting all of the vital points, both for the game in general, and for their bounty hunter to feel bounty-hunter-y.

Now, the details of how best to do this are more art than science.  The Templates Toolkit and Specialists both offer plenty of advice.  The rest is just tinkering around and seeing what comes out.  In general, I find it best to start with the BAT, then hit the high notes.  First, determine the most important and necessary advantages and take them (for our Bounty Hunter, that's Law Enforcement, Combat Reflexes and Luck).  Then determine the most important skills, and take them at appropriate skill levels (18 for true mastery/specialization, 16 for excellence, 14 for reliable competence, 12 for basic competence, and 10 for something you might use sometimes). If you have several viable approaches (for example, you could take Brawl or Karate), make a list of options. Then optimize your skills and traits to get the most out of your points (if you have 10 IQ skills that you've spend 20 points in each, you could take a talent or improved IQ to save points in skills), and then take any remaining points and put them into Advantages or optional "secondary" skills.

In regards to optimization, I'm a big fan of talents. A talent or two can really say a lot about the focus of a character.  The skill sets I found regularly referenced Craftiness, and also referenced Circuit Sense.  If we look at page 31 of Specialists, we see more talents that might useful: Outdoorsman and Smooth Operator leap off the page at me.  Or we can dig through Power Ups 3: Talents and find some nice talents. It's not strictly necessary, but I enjoy it, so I will. While many talents can fit, I prefer those that draw attention (both in their name and in what they do) to the purpose of the character.  Keeping this in the mind, I chose Impersonator, Stalker and Tough Guy.

Finally, we should pay attention to point cost... but how many points?  Well, a standard GURPS Action Template is 250 points, including a 20 point "background lens."  I like the idea of that background lens, so I'm going to shoot for 230 + 20 point background lens.  I suspect this will still not be enough (because this is a setting that features expert martial artists who also have super powers), but it'll do for this iteration.

Here is my resulting template:

Bounty Hunter Draft 1: 250

Attributes: ST 11 [10], DX 13 [60]; IQ 13 [60]; HT 12 [20] (150)
Secondary Characteristics: Damage 1d-1/1d+1; BL 24 lbs; HP 11 [0]; Will 13 [0]; Per 14 [5]; FP 12 [0]; Basic Speed 6.00 [-5]; Basic Move 6 [0]. (0)
Advantages: Combat Reflexes [15], Legal Enforcement Powers (Bounty Hunter License) [5], Luck [15]. (35) A total of 35 points from the following: +1 to +3 ST [10/level], +1 DX [20], +1 IQ [20], +1 to +2 HT [10/level], +1 to +3 HP [2/level], Perception +1 [5], +1 Basic Speed [20], +1 to +3 Basic Move [5/level], Acute Senses (Any) [2/level], Ambidexterity [5], Appearance (Attractive or Beautiful) [4 or 12], Cat Fall [10], Craftiness [5/level], Danger Sense [15], Daredevil [15], Enhanced Dodge 1 [15], either Fearlessness [2/level] or Unfazeable [15], Fit or Very Fit [5 or 15], Gizmos 1-3 [5 to 15], Gunslinger [25], Hard to Kill [2/level], Hard to Subdue [2/level], High Pain Threshold [10], Impersonator [5/level], Intuition [15], Night Vision 1-9 [1/level], Peripheral Vision [15], Rapid Healing or Very Rapid Healing [5 or 15], Rapier Wit [5], Recovery [10], Resistant to Poison +3 or +8 [3 or 5], Serendipity 1-2 [15/level], Signature Gear [Varies], Stalker [5/level], Tough Guy [5/level], Wild Talent 1 [20], or Upgrade Luck [15] to Extraordinary Luck [30] for 15 points or choose from some of the perks below:
Perks: Alcohol Tolerance, Equipment Bond (Vehicle), High Heeled Heroine, Honest Face, Off-Hand Weapon Training, Penetrating Voice, Weapon Bond
Disadvantages: A total of 50 points from the following:
Primary Skills: Criminology (A) IQ+1 [4]-14, Law (Galactic) (H) IQ-1 [2]-12 and Streetwise (A) IQ+1 [4]-14; Select two from Research or Shadowing both (A) IQ+1 [4]-14, Intelligence Analysis (H) IQ [4]-13, or Observation, Search or Tracking all (A) Per+1 [4]-15.
Secondary Skills: Stealth (A) DX+1 [4]-14; Pilot (Contragravity or Starship) (A) DX+1 [4]-14, Beam Weapons (Pistol) DX+2 [4]-15; Two of Fast-Draw (Ammo, Pistol, Long-Arm, Sword) all (E) DX+2* [2]-16, Beam Weapons (Rifle or Projector) both (E) DX+1 [2]-14 or Shortsword or Throwing both (A) DX [2]-13; Choose one of Brawling (E) DX+2 [4]-14 or Karate (H) DX [4]-13; Choose one of Wrestling (A) DX+2 [8]-15 or Judo (H) DX+1 [8]-14;  Choose two of Savoir-Faire (High Society, Mafia or Military) all (E) IQ+1 [2]-14, Acting, Fast-Talk both (A) IQ [2]-13, Carousing (E) HT+1 [2]-13, Sex Appeal (A) HT [2]-12, Intimidation (A) Will [2]-13; Choose four of Forced Entry (E) DX+1 [2]-14, Climbing (A) DX [2], Acrobatics (H) DX-1 [2]-12, Camouflage or First Aid, both (E) IQ+1 [2]-14, Disguise, Electronics (Sensors or Surveillance), Explosives (Demolition), Holdout, Mechanic (Contragravity or Starship), Navigation (Hyperspace), Smuggling or Traps all (A) IQ [2]-13, Tactics (H) IQ-1 [2]-12, Swimming (E) HT+1 [2]-13, Hiking or Running both (A) HT [2]-12 or Scrounging, Survival (Any) or Urban Survival, all (A) Per [2]-14;
Background Skills: Computer Operation (E) IQ [1]-13; Vacc Suit (A) DX-1 [1]-12; Choose 20 points from a background lens;

Sanity Check

What do we need to be able to do this a character? First, the everyman stuff: Every Psi-Wars character should be able to work a computer, wear a vacuum suit, fly a ship or a vehicle, hike, sneak, shoot a blaster pistol, fight unarmed, talk his way out of a situation (influence skill), and take care of his wounds. Can we do all of that? Check.

Next, what were our goals? Using our updated version Action 2 and our goals, can we:
  • Get a job?  Well... uh, no.  We don't have any kind of Current Affairs, though I suppose we could use our general fact-finding skills.  Better would be a Law-Enforcement contact.  We might also consider a Reputation: Typical Star Wars bounty hunters seem to be straight-up mercenaries. They get work by having a reputation for being effective and dangerous.
  • Find our target? Yeah. Criminology is a must, for understanding the criminal mind. We also have two additional skills required for researching things (See “Gathering Intel”).
  • Get to our target? Yeah. We have Pilot as a must, and we have options like navigation, survival, climbing and swimming for making it the long way.
  • Getting close to our target? Yeah, stealth is required, but we have several “impersonation” skills for sliding in close, and quite a few advantages in that direction as well (that's why hotness is an option for bounty hunters), and why we have options like holdout.
  • Taking our target down? Yeah. We have hand-to-hand skills as a must as well as pistols, plus numerous other combat skills, and several trap options.
  • Turning our target in? Yeah. Law and Law Enforcement are required.
How do we compare to our original template? The original had Cultural Adaptability, Indomitable, Photographic Memory, Single-Minded and Social Chameleon, which we're missing. I don't see the need for Photographic Memory, but the rest have their uses: Cultural Adaptability and Social Chameleon help to get close to your target, Indomitable prevents them from talking you down, and Single Minded just fits the mindset. However, none of these are listed in the accepted advantages except Cultural Adaptability. Let's go ahead and add that and, while we're at it, add Cultural Familiarity and Language. Our Bounty Hunter is well-traveled! For skills, we literally hit every note that the original template had, sans bullets. Well done!

Now let's compare it to a typical action template. We don't want to be too broad, or give the player too many choices (density will be too high). We currently have 39 options (not counting perks) in our Advantages list, while the typical Action character has less than 20 and even the Specialist BAT has only 35 or so. Can we trim? Well, I can remove Cat Fall, Peripheral Vision, Rapier Wit and Recovery, leaving ~35. The problem seems to be that the Bounty Hunter is a little bit of everything: It's highly believable that the Bounty Hunter excels at finding people, killing people, seducing people, surviving just about anything, and flying away in their ship at high speeds.  We could probably ditch the Impersonation/Cultural Adaptability elements (that seems more the schtick of the spy), but given that they were in the original Bounty Hunter template in Space, I'm not quite ready to discard them yet. The character concept may well be too broad, but I'm willing to give it a shot for now. We can fix it later.

Disadvantages

This works the same as the skillsets, only we comb through the disadvantage options looking for the proper characterization/troubles that might afflict our bounty hunter, and then separate them into primary and optional. The primary will be selected first, and the optional will come later, like in the Action templates. The first set is priced so that the player can afford at least one copy of the worst disadvantage, or around half of his points, and the rest of his -50 comes from the optional.


The only required disadvantages should be absolutely requisite (like Duty for a soldier). For primary disadvantages, try to favor disadvantages that the GM can either form core of the character concept, or that act as a hook for pulling the character into action. Avoid any disadvantage that would stop the character from fulfilling his role (If you must have a disadvantage that might prevent a character from fulfilling his role, or that would pull him from the action, make it a secondary, so it comes up less often).

My chosen disadvantage packages were:

  • Antisocial: Bounty hunters get a higher share if they hunt alone.  Thus, many of the best might have more than just a chip on their shoulder.
  • Checkered Past: I presume that if a bounty hunter could be a cop, he would be.  Something drives him out into the rim, and one thing that does that might be some shady past.
  • Cocky: A willingness to leave the safety of the core for the danger of the rim requires a certain level of overconfidence.
  • Hard-Boiled: Life on the rim exposes bounty hunters to the darker sides of human nature.
  • Honorable: Bounty hunters might not brim with righteousness, but they do acknowledge the power and importance of the law.  In fact, they are the longest arm of the law.
  • Obsessed: A bounty hunter needs more drive than most people to get out of his comfy bed, and go into the darkest dives and deepest hidey holes, risking life and limb, to bring a man back.
  • Scarred: Too many run-ins with the dark-side of the world can leave bounty hunters in a bad way.  They might carry physical or metaphorical scars from their times delving into the dark-side.
  • Vice-Prone: Bounty Hunters do not hunt just for pleasure or a sense of honor. They hunt, explicitly, for the money.  Thus, one expects they have extra needs that need to be fulfilled.
Using the same method before, I derived the following primary and optional list:

Primary Disadvantages: Code of Honor (Pirate's or Professional's) [-5], Greed [-15*], Impulsive [-10], Obsession (Bring a specific target to justice) [-5*], Overconfidence [-5*], Sense of Duty (Team) [-5], Workaholic [-5]
Optional Disadvantages: Alcoholism [-15], Appearance (Unattractive to Ugly) [-4 to -8], Bully [-10*], Callous [-5], Flashbacks [-5 to -10], Jealousy [-10], Laziness [-10], Lecherousness [-15], Loner [-5*], No Sense of Humor [-10], Odious Personal Habit [-5 to -15], Pacifism (Cannot Harm Innocents) [-10], Post-Combat Shakes [-5*], Secret (Past Crimes) [-5 to -20], Selfish [-5*], Social Stigma (Criminal Record) [-5], Stubbornness [-5*], Trademark [-5 to -15].

This list looks good enough: -15 in the primary disadvantages, and the remaining -35 in the rest.  A quick sanity check: Are we missing anything from the Space template? Only the Vow, but I don't much like that Vow in any case.  How's the density?  At 25, we're on the high end (most of my templates run dense), but there are Action templates with more.

Now, combining the disadvantages with the changes I had previously wanted to make gives us this:

Bounty Hunter Draft 2: 250 points

Attributes: ST 11 [10], DX 13 [60]; IQ 13 [60]; HT 11 [10]
Secondary Characteristics: Damage 1d-1/1d+1; BL 24 lbs; HP 11 [0]; Will 13 [0]; Per 14 [5]; FP 12 [0]; Basic Speed 6.00 []; Basic Move 6 [0]. 
Advantages: Combat Reflexes [15], Legal Enforcement Powers (Bounty Hunter License) [5], Luck [15]. (35) A total of 40 points from the following: +1 to +3 ST [10/level], +1 DX [20], +1 IQ [20], +1 to +2 HT [10/level], +1 to +3 HP [2/level], Perception +1 [5], +1 Basic Speed [20], +1 to +3 Basic Move [5/level], Acute Senses (Any) [2/level], Ambidexterity [5], Appearance (Attractive or Beautiful) [4 or 12], Contact Group (Space Patrol or Security Agency; Skill-12, 15, or 18; 9 or less; Somewhat Reliable) [5, 10, or 15], Craftiness [5/level], Cultural Adaptability [10], Cultural Familiarity [1/level], Danger Sense [15], Daredevil [15], Enhanced Dodge 1 [15], either Fearlessness [2/level] or Unfazeable [15], Fit or Very Fit [5 or 15], Gizmos 1-3 [5 to 15], Gunslinger [25], Hard to Kill [2/level], Hard to Subdue [2/level], High Pain Threshold [10], Impersonator [5/level], Intuition [15], Language [2-6], Night Vision 1-9 [1/level], Rapid Healing or Very Rapid Healing [5 or 15], Reputation (Badass or Gets the Job Done, low-lifes only -50%) +1 to +4 [3, 5, 8 or 10], Resistant to Poison +3 or +8 [3 or 5], Serendipity 1-2 [15/level], Signature Gear [Varies], Stalker [5/level], Tough Guy [5/level], Wild Talent 1 [20], or Upgrade Luck [15] to Extraordinary Luck [30] for 15 points or choose from some of the perks below:
Perks: Alcohol Tolerance, Blaster Perks, Equipment Bond (Vehicle), High Heeled Heroine, Honest Face, Off-Hand Weapon Training, Penetrating Voice, Weapon Bond
Disadvantages: A total of -15 points from Code of Honor (Pirate's or Professional's) [-5], Greed [-15*], Impulsive [-10], Intolerance (Criminals) [-5], Obsession (Bring a specific target to justice) [-5*], Overconfidence [-5*], Sense of Duty (Team) [-5], Workaholic [-5]; Choose -35 points from the previous, or from the following: Appearance (Unattractive to Ugly) [-4 to -8], Bad Temper [-10*], Bully [-10*], Callous [-5], Flashbacks [-5 to -10], Jealousy [-10], Loner [-5*], No Sense of Humor [-10], Odious Personal Habit [-5 to -15], Pacifism (Cannot Harm Innocents) [-10], Post-Combat Shakes [-5*], Secret (Past Crimes) [-5 to -20], Social Stigma (Criminal Record) [-5], Stubbornness [-5*], Trademark [-5 to -15]
Primary Skills: Criminology (A) IQ+1 [4]-14, Law (Galactic) (H) IQ-1 [2]-12 and Streetwise (A) IQ+1 [4]-14; Select two from Research or Shadowing both (A) IQ+1 [4]-14, Intelligence Analysis (H) IQ [4]-13, or Observation, Search or Tracking all (A) Per+1 [4]-15.
Secondary Skills: Stealth (A) DX+1 [4]-14; Pilot (Contragravity or Starship) (A) DX+1 [4]-14, Beam Weapons (Pistol) DX+2 [4]-15; Two of Fast-Draw (Ammo, Pistol, Long-Arm, Sword) all (E) DX+2* [2]-16, Beam Weapons (Rifle or Projector) both (E) DX+1 [2]-14 or Shortsword or Throwing both (A) DX [2]-13; Choose one of Brawling (E) DX+2 [4]-15 or Karate (H) DX [4]-13; Choose one of Wrestling (A) DX+2 [8]-15 or Judo (H) DX+1 [8]-14; Choose two of Savoir-Faire (High Society, Mafia or Military) all (E) IQ+1 [2]-14, Acting, Fast-Talk both (A) IQ [2]-13, Carousing (E) HT+1 [2]-12, Sex Appeal (A) HT [2]-11, Intimidation (A) Will [2]-13; Choose four of Forced Entry or Jumping both (E) DX+1 [2]-14, Climbing (A) DX [2], Acrobatics (H) DX-1 [2]-12, Camouflage or First Aid, both (E) IQ+1 [2]-14, Disguise, Electronics (Sensors or Surveillance), Explosives (Demolition), Holdout, Mechanic (Contragravity or Starship), Navigation (Hyperspace), Smuggling or Traps all (A) IQ [2]-13, Tactics (H) IQ-1 [2]-12, Swimming (E) HT+1 [2]-13, Hiking or Running both (A) HT [2]-11 or Scrounging, Survival (Any) or Urban Survival, all (A) Per [2]-14;
Background Skills: Computer Operation (E) IQ [1]-13; Vacc Suit (A) DX-1 [1]-12; Choose 20 points from a background lens.

*: Modified by self-control value
1: +1 from Combat Reflexes

Impersonator can be found on page 11 of Power-Ups 3: Talents (and only there, evidently), Stalker can be found on page 15 of Power-Ups 3: Talents or GURPS Martial Arts Fairbairn Close Combat System and GURPS SEALs in Vietnam, and Tough Guy can be found on page 16 of Power-Ups 3: Talents and in GURPS Mysteries.

And there you have it, a usable template that hits all the high points of being a bounty hunter and feels at least a little like a Space Opera character.

(EDIT: Added Intolerance (Criminals) [-5] as a primary disadvantage at Kalzazz's suggestion)
Bounty Hunters by Art of Ty

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